Introducing: The Jaeger-LeCoultre Geophysic Tourbillon Universal Time

Home/Blog/Introducing: The Jaeger-LeCoultre Geophysic Tourbillon Universal Time

Introducing: The Jaeger-LeCoultre Geophysic Tourbillon Universal Time

In anticipation of this year’s Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie (SIHH), Jaeger-LeCoultre has released a new addition to the Geophysic collection – the Tourbillon Universal Time. You may remember that back in September 2015 Jaeger-LeCoultre presented the original Geophysic Universal Time, but this year it has taken the watch a step further by adding a flying tourbillon. It’s actually the first time a worldtimer and a flying tourbillon have come together ever.

Introducing: The Jaeger-LeCoultre Geophysic Tourbillon Universal Time Introducing: The Jaeger-LeCoultre Geophysic Tourbillon Universal Time 555

The new Universal Time Tourbillon is quite an impressive piece. The case is solid platinum and measures a whopping 43.5mm in diameter and 11.24mm in height. The dial is the familiar blue lacquered guilloché with a flattened image of the world as the focal point that you find on the earlier non-tourbillon version of this watch.

There is an outer ring featuring 24 cities and a secondary ring outside that with 24-hour indication. As with all worldtimers, the way you read the time in each city is by lining it up with the hour on the ring next to it. Pretty simple. The big kahuna, a.k.a. the flying tourbillon, is placed in the bottom right quadrant of the dial, slightly cutting into the cities ring.

Introducing: The Jaeger-LeCoultre Geophysic Tourbillon Universal Time Introducing: The Jaeger-LeCoultre Geophysic Tourbillon Universal Time Jaeger LeCoultre Geophysic Tourbillon Universal Time close up dial

The movement is the Jaeger-LeCoultre caliber 948, which is automatic with a solid 22-carat pink gold winding  rotor and a 48-hour power reserve. There are 375 components in all, 42 of which are jewels, but the most notable component might be the Gyrolab balance. This is a speical JLC technology that took over eight years to develop and produce. The Gyrolab is used exclusively in the Geophysic collection and is known for its unusual rounded h-shape and its high level of efficiency. Compared to a standard circular balance wheel there is less surface area, and thus less air friction, hence the higher efficiency. Pretty neat stuff.

The Geophysic Tourbillon Universal Time will be released officially at SIHH in a little more than a week and is a limited edition series of just 100 pieces. Be sure to check back for live pictures and pricing. For more information, visit Jaeger-LeCoultre online.

By | 2017-01-04T23:51:38+00:00 January 4th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

About the Author: